Deedeeoho

Small town Oregonian living in Tokyo, Japan. instagram: deedeeoho

最高のカラオケだった😻💕🌝 @yuki_not_rinko is the lost backstreet boy OBVIOUSLY.

Some doodles from tonight!

cute-pubes:

"I’ve definitely been the type to see a beautiful woman walk into a room and feel less-than, have a friend receive a better grade and feel stupid, or, honestly, see any woman doing anything spectacular at all and feel not only jealous, but also the nagging feeling that I could never accomplish the same things.
When I looked at other women’s accomplishments, I felt worse about myself.
I would first note the gaps and weaknesses in my own life, and then start picking and finding ways to break down the women who were – as far as I could tell – responsible for making me feel this way.
Criticizing was my defense mechanism.
And even though I thought it would make me feel good, all it really did was make me feel depleted and disappointed in myself.
I think that this – girl-on-girl hate – is a phenomenon that many of us can relate to. We get so many messages telling us that only some women are successful, that only certain women are beautiful, that we need to fight to get to the top where there are limited spots that we turn on one another.
Even just by looking at many television shows, movies, and magazines – especially ones aimed at women, we can see how women are pitted against one another. And we act that out in reality, too.
It’s the best joke the patriarchy ever played on us.
It’s easy to cut each other down, to make comparisons, and to criticize. It’s what we’ve been taught to do.
But think for a minute about what our lives would look and feel like if instead, we were supportive – if we celebrated instead of lamented.
Maybe we could learn to see other women’s ways of being or accomplishments as models for what we could achieve – or as examples of our glorious diversity – as opposed to reflections of what we lack.
It took me awhile to see other women as allies, but here’s what worked for me.”Read more here

cute-pubes:

"I’ve definitely been the type to see a beautiful woman walk into a room and feel less-than, have a friend receive a better grade and feel stupid, or, honestly, see any woman doing anything spectacular at all and feel not only jealous, but also the nagging feeling that I could never accomplish the same things.

When I looked at other women’s accomplishments, I felt worse about myself.

I would first note the gaps and weaknesses in my own life, and then start picking and finding ways to break down the women who were – as far as I could tell – responsible for making me feel this way.

Criticizing was my defense mechanism.

And even though I thought it would make me feel good, all it really did was make me feel depleted and disappointed in myself.

I think that this – girl-on-girl hate – is a phenomenon that many of us can relate to. We get so many messages telling us that only some women are successful, that only certain women are beautiful, that we need to fight to get to the top where there are limited spots that we turn on one another.

Even just by looking at many television shows, movies, and magazines – especially ones aimed at women, we can see how women are pitted against one another. And we act that out in reality, too.

It’s the best joke the patriarchy ever played on us.

It’s easy to cut each other down, to make comparisons, and to criticize. It’s what we’ve been taught to do.

But think for a minute about what our lives would look and feel like if instead, we were supportive – if we celebrated instead of lamented.

Maybe we could learn to see other women’s ways of being or accomplishments as models for what we could achieve – or as examples of our glorious diversity – as opposed to reflections of what we lack.

It took me awhile to see other women as allies, but here’s what worked for me.”

Read more here

(via cute-pubes)

A sketch dump from this week.